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DONOT COMMENT SAME ONE AGAIN

DO NOT COMMENT THE SAME ONE AGAIN.
When you do not see your comments, I have a print out of your comments. DoNot do the same one again because you do not see it.
Just continue to the ones you have not done.
To do ALL of the assignment: Hit the OLDER POST Key at the bottom of the page.
Thanks. From Ms. P Nobles

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Nutrient Values

Foods List


How much of what nutrient is in what foods?  For help with planning a diet and meal plan, to get the most benefit from food choices click the link above.

Changing the Yield of a Recipe

1.  Divide the desired yield by the recipe's original yield.
     Do this whether increasing or decreasing a yield.

     Decrease
     original yield is 12 servings; desired yield is 6 serving;
     6 divided by 12 equals 0.5 or 1/2

     Increase
     original yield is 4 servings; desired yield is 7 serving;
     7 divided by 4 equals 1.75 or 1-3/4

2. Multiply each ingredient amount by the result in step 1.

     Decrease
     original amount is 1/2 c.;
     1/2 times 1/2 equals 1/4c as the new amount.

     Increase
     original amount is 1/2c.;
     0.5 times 1.75 equals 0.88c as the new amount.

3. Convert the measurements into logical, mangeable amounts.

     Decrease
     1/4c.  easy to measure with equipment

     Increase
     1/2c equals 4 oz.;
      4 oz. times 1.75 equals 7oz. or 3/4 c. plus 1/8 c.;
      or 3/4c plus 2 tablespoons

4. Make any adjustments in equipment, temperature and cooking time.

KITCHEN CONVERSIONS

KITCHEN CONVERSIONS

Cup
Fluid Ounces
Tablespoons
Teaspoons
1
8
16
48
¾
6
12
36
2/3
5
11
32
½
4
8
24
1/3
3
5
16
¼
2
4
12
1/8
1
2
6
1/16
½
1
3

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
Click on link for extensive information.


The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, released on January 31, 2011, emphasize three major goals for Americans:

·         Balance calories with physical activity to manage weight

·         Consume more of certain foods and nutrients such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and seafood

·         Consume fewer foods with sodium (salt), saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, and refined grains

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 include 23 key recommendations for the general population and 6 additional key recommendations for specific population groups, such as pregnant women. The recommendations are intended to help people choose an overall healthy diet.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are the cornerstone of Federal nutrition policy and nutrition education activities.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are jointly issued and updated every 5 years by the
Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). They provide authoritative advice about consuming fewer calories, making informed food choices, and being physically active to attain and maintain a healthy weight, reduce risk of chronic disease, and promote overall health.

Recommendations from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans are intended for Americans ages 2 years and over, including those at increased risk of chronic disease. The Guidelines encourage Americans to focus on eating a healthful diet — one that focuses on foods and beverages that help achieve and maintain a healthy weight, promote health, and prevent disease.

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are the 7th edition released since 1980 and remain the current edition until the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are released.

ChooseMyPlate


In June 2011, ChooseMyPlate replaced MyPyramid.

ChooseMyPlate is part of a larger communication initiative based on 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans to help consumers make better food choices.

ChooseMyPlate is designed to remind Americans to eat healthfully; it is not intended to change consumer behavior alone.

ChooseMyPlate illustrates the five food groups using a familiar mealtime visual, a place setting.

www.ChooseMyPlate.gov

Common Equivalent Measures



VOLUME AND WEIGHT EQUIVALENTS


Customary Measurements
Approximate Metric Measurements*
VOLUME
¼ tsp.
1 mL
½ tsp.
2 mL
1 tsp.
5 mL
1 Tbsp.
3 tsp.
½ fl. oz.
15 mL
1/8 cup
2 Tbsp.
1 fl. oz.
30 mL
¼ cup
4 Tbsp.
2 fl. oz.
50 mL
1/3 cup
5 Tbsp.
3 fl. oz.
75 mL
½ cup
8 Tbsp.
4 fl. oz.
125 mL
2/3 cup
11 Tbsp.
5 fl. oz.
150 mL
¾ cup
12 Tbsp.
6 fl. oz.
175 mL
1 cup
16 Tbsp.
8 fl. oz.
250 mL
1 pint
2 cups
16 fl. oz.
500 mL
1 quart
2 pints (4 cups)
32 fl. oz.
1 L
1 gallon
4 quarts (8 pints; 16 cups)
128 fl. oz.
4L
WEIGHT
1 oz.
28 g
1 lb.
16 oz.
448 g
2.2 lb.
35 oz.
1000 g or 1 kg
*Volumes have been rounded to correspond to metric measuring tools.

Friday, October 3, 2014

(S1)Unit 2: THE BASICS OF NUTRITION

Unit 2: The Basics of Nutrition
  • Dietary Guidelines
  • ChooseMyPlate
  • Essential Nutrients
  • Nutrition Labels
  • Career Pathways